TOUCHSTONE GALLERY

 
Fine draughtsmanship is the heart of this sculpture. The artist makes the illusion of movement by subtly manipulating the linear elements of the work and the illusion of the movement of light over form by the rigorous control of cast shadow within and among all of the work’s components. These are some of the means; the end result is the manifestation of a personality in which a lyrical impulse contends actively with the will to contain it.
— Jonathan silver
In her welded sculptures, one sees very quickly evidence of an inner strength coupled with a lyrical outlook.
— Barbara Hirschl, Woman's news
 
The work with its combination of straight and curved, linear and solid elements has a balletic grace. It reminds you inevitably of Anthony Caro’s more linear works but is lighter in tone. In their witty way, they also remind you of Calder.
— John Dorsey, Baltimore Sun
Susan Rodgers’ elegant steel sculptures allude to movements of the body.
— New York Woman
WALKING STICK

WALKING STICK

 

GRUENEBAUM GALLERY

 
With her exhibition at the Gruenebaum Galery, Susan Rodgers has established herself as one of the best steel sculptors around. She works with scraps that she finds mainly in junkyards. She lengthens or shortens, twists or bends the steel, but leaves it fundamentally unaltered. Soe scraps are welded together, others left unjoined: this fluent, confident, seemingly harmonious vision is filled with absence.
— Michael Brenson | NYTimes
 

FAMILY OUTING

FAMILY OUTING

HALLER GALLERY

 
Rodgers sculptures are made primarily of strips and ribbons of weathered and treated steel (sometimes “found” shapes of varying origin), which afford her a light, flexible method of drawing in space. The works look natural and inwardly harmonious: They refer to a country lifestyle - not a city one.
— Cynthia Nadelman, 11.1982
 
 
Susan Rodgers’ work illustrates the wondrous transformation industrial sheet metal can undergo when it is in the hands of a skillful sculptor. Rodgers uses junkyard scraps and ribbons of weathered steel to create fluent, harmonious, and remarkably delicate pieces. Virtually drawing in space, she twists, bends and welds the steel strips together but leaves them fundamentally unaltered.
— M.M. 5.1992
 
 

SAINT GAUDENS

SKETCH OF INSTALLATION AT SAINT GAUDENS
 
 

COLLECTIONS

 
Rodgers’ metal sculptures are light, open and space-enclosing. They are the quintessence f modern drawn in space sculpture. She comes out of the solid sculptural tradition of Roszak and Agostini, but her wok has more in common with Calder and David Smith in its linear playfulness, a sort of now-you-see-it now-you-don’t, manipulation of space, shaped by the shaply cut lines of metal.
— April Kingsley, The Sculpture Center